sometimesilovemylife:

blueboxtraveller:

In case you’re in need of motivation, have some from the Doctor.

You can do it!

I need this right now.

lowsk:

sexular:

coconola:

Amethyst Bath tub

lowsk:

sexular:

coconola:

Amethyst Bath tub

(via sometimesilovemylife)

nocturnalangel:

MOST GENIUS THING EVER MADE. :’D

(via heysaturdaysun)

pornforblindmagazine:

little snake in sweater

I want one!!

(via heysaturdaysun)

thingsmissfrizzlewouldwear:

Periodic Table Bowtie

so amazing!!!

thingsmissfrizzlewouldwear:

Periodic Table Bowtie

so amazing!!!

This is how i feel about everything these days, especially Olin.

This is how i feel about everything these days, especially Olin.

(via allthelooksoflovewerestaged)

heyoscarwilde:

When We Was Fab
illustration by Alex Cherry :: via vhm-alex.deviantart.com

heyoscarwilde:

When We Was Fab

illustration by Alex Cherry :: via vhm-alex.deviantart.com

(via heysaturdaysun)

jtotheizzoe:

The Celestaphone: Sounds of Space
There is no sound in space. But thanks to one special instrument, we can hear sound made from space, in a sense. Meet the “Celestaphone”, an instrument made from meteorites. 
Sound, although it’s invisible, requires a medium in order to propagate. Without piggybacking on air molecules in order to deliver all those waves of varying frequency and amplitude, sound itself does not exist. Hence no sound in space. 
That didn’t stop Clair Omar Musser from making sound from space. He began collecting fallen meteorites in the 1930’s, eventually collecting over 1,388 pounds of space rock. Some of these contained metal, and some more dense and smooth rock. 678 pounds of that collection went into the frame and bars of the Celestaphone, the world’s first and only instrument made completely of meteorites.
Thanks to the guys at Everything Sounds, you can hear the Celestaphone in action in this recent episode (it currently lives at the Rhythm! Discovery Center in Indianapolis). You don’t want to miss it. Behold the sound of the stars!

jtotheizzoe:

The Celestaphone: Sounds of Space

There is no sound in space. But thanks to one special instrument, we can hear sound made from space, in a sense. Meet the “Celestaphone”, an instrument made from meteorites. 

Sound, although it’s invisible, requires a medium in order to propagate. Without piggybacking on air molecules in order to deliver all those waves of varying frequency and amplitude, sound itself does not exist. Hence no sound in space. 

That didn’t stop Clair Omar Musser from making sound from space. He began collecting fallen meteorites in the 1930’s, eventually collecting over 1,388 pounds of space rock. Some of these contained metal, and some more dense and smooth rock. 678 pounds of that collection went into the frame and bars of the Celestaphone, the world’s first and only instrument made completely of meteorites.

Thanks to the guys at Everything Sounds, you can hear the Celestaphone in action in this recent episode (it currently lives at the Rhythm! Discovery Center in Indianapolis). You don’t want to miss it. Behold the sound of the stars!

(via fuckyeah-chemistry)

I follow tumblrs and somethings are too fantastic not to store

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